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Tournament


Tournaments are often one day events during which a group of players play 4-5 battles against eachother to determine who's top dog.

These rules are also available as a PDF download below together with the processing forms you can use to run the tournament with.

Download Tournament Guide v1.4 (104kb pdf)

Download Tournament Processing Forms (27kb pdf)

Order your Tournament Prize Support here.

Format


Our tournaments use the 'Swiss' system, consisting of a series of rounds in which every competitor plays a game. The aim is to pair off players of an equivalent skill level in order to maintain a good level of competitive play, and at the same time produce a clear winner.

In the first round players are paired off against random opponents, and in the second and subsequent rounds they are paired off against those whose current performance most closely matches their own. The eventual winner will be the player who delivers the strongest overall performance throughout the course of the tournament.

Tournament Organisers


Throughout this document we refer to the 'Tournament Organiser', by this we mean the person in charge of running the tournament. Among a host of other things, the organiser is responsible for pairing off players for each round, and deciding the tournament winner. Organisers invariably put a huge amount of work into a tournament, and players should respect this and treat them politely. In addition, the organiser is likely to have enlisted others to help in various official capacities, for example as game umpires and referees, and they should get similar treatment.

Gameplay Rulings


During their games we encourage opponents to attempt to come to an agreement over rules interpretations that they disagree on, being a good sport is an important part of tournament play. However, if after discussing it they still cannot agree, in order to get their game moving again they should consult an umpire or referee for a ruling. Once delivered, such a ruling is final and not subject to discussion. Play should proceed immediately.

Rounds


The number of rounds required to produce a clear winner under this system depends on the number of participating players. The more players there are, the more rounds required. Each additional round doubles the maximum number of players that can be catered for, see below.

No. of PLayersNo. of Rounds
5-83
9-164
17-325
..and so on up

Game Time Limits

Each round of games is of equal duration, starting at a set time and ending at a set time. These are set by the organiser, and depend on the number of rounds in the tournament. It is the player's responsibility to be ready at the allotted time. Games that have not reached a natural conclusion end when time is called. The organiser will normally give players 10 or 15 minutes warning that the time limit is approaching so that they can end their current game turn.

Tournament Points


At the end of each of their games players score 'Tournament Points' based on their performance, and at the start of the following round their accumulated score is used to pair them off with an opponent that has a similar score. At the end of the final round of games the player with highest accumulated tournament point score is the tournament winner.

The number of tournament points awarded to each player at the end of a battle depends on the relative number of casualties inflicted on each side, and on whether any scenario specific goals were accomplished (see later, in the sections on Game Results & Scoring).

Score Cards

Score Cards are an essential part of the tournament system. They're used by players to record their scores, and by organisers to pair off opponents before the start of each round of games.

At the top of each card are boxes for a player's name, and very importantly, their unique ID number. This number is allocated by the organiser and is used to pair up opponents before the start of each round. Under these are boxes for a player's faction, their force's point value, the number of models in their force and their force's 'Casualty Thresholds' (explained below). The tournament organiser fills out all these boxes.

The middle area of the card contains boxes for a player's opponent ID number and their table number. The organiser uses these when allocating a player their opponent for an upcoming round, and a table on which they'll play.

Finally, along the bottom of the card are boxes for recording a players tournament point score at the end of each game, their accumulated subtotal from round to round, and their opponents score for each game. To help keep everyone honest these are filled out by a player's opponent at the end of each of his or her games. Player's score cards are given to them by the organiser at the start of each round, and must be completed and returned to the organiser at the end of each game.

Casualty Thresholds

All forces have three Casualty Thresholds, these being Moderate, Heavy and Severe. They show the points at which a force has lost a quarter (25%), a half (50%), and three quarters (75%) of the models it started out with.

For example, if an Urban War force contained 12 models, it would have a Moderate casualty threshold of 3 models (25% of 12), a Heavy casualty threshold of 6 models (50% of 12), and a Severe casualty threshold of 9 models (75% of 12).

When calculating casualty thresholds fractions are rounded up. For example, if an Urban War force contained 13 models, it would have a Moderate casualty threshold of 4 models (25% of 13 is 3.25, rounded up to 4), a Heavy casualty threshold of 7 models (50% of 13 is 6.5, rounded up to 7), and a Severe casualty threshold of 10 models (75% of 13 is 9.75, rounded up to 10).

After a game ends the losses a force suffered, and the casualty thresholds it passed, are important in deciding which player won, and in deciding the degree of their victory (see later, in the Game Results & Scoring section).

Summary of Score Card use

Organisers:Fill out a card for each player before the start of the tournament.
Use cards to pair off opponents and allocate them tables before each round of games.
Use scores recorded on cards to decide the tournament winner.
Give players their cards before the start of each round.
Players:Use cards to record tournament point scores at end of each game.
Use cards to record accumulated tournament point sub total.
Return completed cards to the organiser at the end of each game.

First Round Pairing


In the first round players are paired with a randomly selected opponent, with efforts being made to ensure that they are of different factions.

The organiser shuffles the score cards and places them face up in a stack, then selects the top card. This gives the first player of the first pair. The organiser then looks through the remaining cards from the top down, and selects the first one found of a different faction. This gives the second player of the first pair, and these cards are set aside. Without shuffling the cards again, the process then continues for the next pair, and so on until all players have been paired with an opponent. It's still possible that some players will face an opponent of their own faction, but this is a simple way of keeping these situations to a minimum.

After all opponents have been paired off, the organiser writes their player ID number in the box provided on their opponent's card.

Second & Subsequent Round Pairing


In the second and subsequent rounds players are paired off based on their accumulated tournament point score so far, with the highest scorer being paired off against the next highest, and so on down. The only exception is that players cannot be paired with opponents that they have previously played against.

The organiser sorts the score cards into descending order, from the highest score to the lowest, and places them face up in a stack, with the highest scorer on top and the lowest at the bottom. As before, the top card is then selected and this gives the first player of the first pair. The organiser then looks through the remaining cards from the top down, and selects the first one found that the first player has not previously played against. This gives the second player of the first pair, and these cards are set aside. The process then continues for the next pair, and so on until all players have been paired with an opponent.

As before, after all opponents have been paired off, the organiser writes their player ID number in the box provided on their opponent's card.

Table Allocation


After the player pairings have been decided, the organiser allocates each pair of opponents a table on which to play their game, writing the table number in the box provided on their score cards. As the rounds progress an effort is made to ensure that players are allocated a table that they have not previously played on. In this, higher scoring players get preference over lower scoring ones.

In the first round pairs of opponents are allocated tables on a first come first served basis, with the first pair being allocated table 1, the second pair table 2, and so on. In the second and subsequent rounds, once a pair of opponents has been selected, they are allocated the lowest table number that neither has previously played on. If between them they have played on all the tables that remain available, they are allocated the lowest table number that the higher scoring of them has not previously played on.

Byes


If there are an odd number of players then it obviously isn't possible to pair them all off with an opponent. In this case a 'Bye' is awarded to one of them, and that player sits out the round.

In the first round a bye is awarded randomly. Before pairing off any players, the organiser shuffles the score cards and places them in a stack face down, then turns over the top card. That player is awarded the bye.

In the second and subsequent rounds a bye is awarded to the player with the lowest accumulated tournament point score. As above, the organiser selects the player and awards the bye before pairing off the other players. Exception: A player cannot receive more than one bye, so if the lowest scoring player has already received a bye, it's awarded to the one with the next lowest score.

Bye Scoring

For tournament point purposes, a bye gives the same number of points as the best possible result for the scenario being played, excluding any scenario dependant bonus points. In most cases this equates to a Crushing Victory (24-0) as described in the Game Results & Scoring section below.

Game Results & Scoring


Games can end in a number of ways, one side might be completely wiped out, time might be called, or a scenario's objectives might be met.

We always use the Strategic Withdrawal Scenario (see Urban War rulebook) for tournaments. The break point at which the opposing forces must first make a strategic withdrawal check is 50%.

For campaign based tournaments we use Strategic Withdrawal in conjunction with other scenarios, which have further objectives. These scenarios will be specified in the campaign tournament documents.

The game ends when one of the following events occurs;

  • One side makes a strategic withdrawal.
  • One side is completely wiped out.
  • The time limit is up.
  • A campaign tournament game may also end when special objectives have been met, these will be detailed in the specific documents.

Whatever the reason, when a game ends, it can result in either a victory of varying degree for one of the players, with a corresponding loss for their opponent, or a draw. The possible results are a Crushing Victory, a Major Victory, a Minor Victory or a Draw. In all cases except a Crushing Victory both players score tournament points, though the loser obviously scores less. In campaign based tournaments bonus tournament points will be allocated for any of the objectives met specified within its additional scenarios. These bonus points will be detailed in the specific campaign tournament documents.

Casualty Levels


The primary way to win a game is to inflict a higher level of casualties on an opponents force than is inflicted on ones own. The higher the proportion of casualties inflicted, and the lower the proportion suffered, the better the degree of victory.

There are four casualty levels that a force can sustain, these being Light, Moderate, Heavy and Severe. To determine which level was sustained, the number of models a force lost is compared to its casualty thresholds, and the following apply.

  • Light casualties were sustained if the number of models a force lost is less than its moderate casualty threshold.
  • Moderate casualties were sustained if the number of models a force lost is equal to or greater than its moderate casualty threshold, but less than its heavy casualty threshold.
  • Heavy casualties were sustained if the number of models a force lost is equal to or greater than its heavy casualty threshold, but less than its severe casualty threshold.
  • Severe casualties were sustained if the number of models a force lost is equal to or greater than its severe casualty threshold.

If a side has been forced to make a Strategic Withdrawal it is assumed to have sustained Severe casualties no matter how many models are left on the table.

Once the casualty levels of the opposing forces are known, they are cross-referenced on the Game Result Table, which shows the degree of victory gained (if any) by one of the players. This result is then checked against the Tournament Points Table, which shows the tournament points each player scored for the game.

Game Result Table

Player A Casualty LevelPlayer B Casualty Level
LightModerateHeavySevere
LightDrawMinor Victory (Player A)Major Victory (Player A)Crushing Victory (Player A)
ModerateMinor Victory (Player B)DrawMinor Victory (Player A)Major Victory (Player A)
HeavyMajor Victory (Player B)Minor Victory (Player B)DrawMinor Victory (Player A)
SevereCrushing Victory (Player B)Major Victory (Player B)Minor Victory (Player B)Draw

Tournament Points Table

Game ResultTournament Points
Crushing VictoryWinner: 24Loser: 0
Major VictoryWinner: 20Loser: 4
Minor VictoryWinner: 16Loser: 8
DrawBoth Players: 12

Conceding

Ideally all games will be played to a conclusion, but sometimes a player may wish to concede. A player that concedes a game must retire from the tournament; he or she can play no more games and is not eligible for a winning place.

Conceded Game Scoring

For tournament point purposes, the conceding player counts as having lost all their models as casualties, and their opponent counts only those that they actually lost. In addition their opponent gains whatever bonus points are relevant to the scenario being played in campaign tournaments.

Deciding the Tournament Winners


First place in the tournament goes to the player with the highest accumulated tournament point score after all games have been played. Second place goes to the player with the next highest accumulated score, and third place to the next highest.

Tiebreaker

If two players are tied for a place the following tiebreaker is used to determine which of them has the higher rank, and therefore gets the place.

  • The total accumulated tournament point score of all opponents that a player faced. The higher rank goes to the player whose opponents scored highest.

This benefits a player who faced tougher opponents overall, and whose play therefore had to be stronger in order to get their score.

Urban War Tournament Games


For Urban War tournament games the following guidelines apply.

  • Team Points Limit: 300 points
  • Table Size: 4'x4'
  • Game Time Limit: 1 hour and 20 minutes maximum, as advised by the organiser.
  • Breaks between games: 10 to 15 minutes, as advised by the organiser.
  • Scenario: Standard Strategic Withdrawal, sometimes with additional scenarios for campaign based tournaments.
  • Deployment Zones: Standard 6" deep strip along opposite sides of the table.

This may vary for campaign based tournaments and will be detailed in the relevant documents.

Players: Required Kit

Along with their tournament force, players should also bring along everything they require in order to compete in the tournament, including all of the following.

  • Two copies of their tournament force list: One to be given to the organiser, and one to keep with them during their games.
  • The relevant game rulebook(s).
  • The relevant stat cards for their force.
  • Counters.
  • Dice.
  • Templates.
  • A tape measure.

In addition it's also a good idea to bring along a pen, a notepad, and an emergency repair kit in case any of their models takes a knock.

Player's Forces: Composition & Lists

A player's tournament force composition cannot be changed from game to game. They must use the same list for all their games. Force lists must be clearly presented and show the following information.

  • The player's name.
  • The player's faction.
  • Details of the models / units in the force and their point cost.
  • The total number of models in the force.
  • The total points cost of the force.

The exact format of the way the information is presented isn't important, so long as the organiser and a player's opponents can easily understand it. We've supplied a blank tournament force list at the back of this document for players to copy and fill out, or to serve as a guide if designing their own.

Models & Troop Representation

In tournaments it's very important for a player's opponent to easily be able to identify the troop types that are being represented by their models. For this reason there are some restrictions on the models that can be used, and the following guidelines apply.

  • Ideally all models should be drawn from the current Urban War / Metropolis range. That said, discontinued models can be used, so long as they are of the same type (e.g. Secutor etc) as a current model. In addition current or discontinued VOID models can be used, so long as they are of the same type as a current Urban War / Metropolis model.
  • No Proxies: Models of the correct type must be used to represent all troops. For example Secutor models must be used to represent Secutors, Marine models to represent Marines etc.
  • Conversions: These are fine so long as they are based on the same type of model as they currently represent, and are easily recognised as what they're meant to be by an opponent. If in doubt, players should bring along a standard unmodified model that can be substituted.